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There are fourteen 8,000 meter peaks (> 26,000 feet) in the World. All of them are in the Himalayas and the Karakoram which borders Nepal, Tibet and Pakistan. These are in fact The Highest Mountains in the World (source: Wikipedia).

Plan Your Next 8000m Climb With New 3D Interactive Maps © Martin Laxenaire!

RANKMOUNTAINHEIGHT (Meters) [2]HEIGHT (Feet)RANGEPARENT MOUNTAIN [5]FIRST ASCENT
1Mount Everest, Sagarmatha, Chomolungma8,848 [7]29,035Mahalangur Himalaya None1953
2K2, Qogir, Godwin Austen8,61128,251Baltoro Karakoram Mount Everest [8]1954
3Kangchenjunga8,58628,169Kangchenjunga HimalayaMount Everest1955
4Lhotse8,51627,940Mahalangur Himalaya Mount Everest1956
5Makalu8,48527,838Mahalangur Himalaya Mount Everest1955
6Cho Oyu8,20126,906Mahalangur Himalaya Mount Everest1954
7Dhaulagiri I8,16726,795Dhaulagiri Himalaya K21960
8Manaslu8,16326,781Manaslu Himalaya Cho Oyu1956
9Nanga Parbat8,12626,660Nanga Parbat Himalaya Dhaulagiri1953
10Annapurna I8,09126,545Annapurna Himalaya Cho Oyu1950
11Gasherbrum I, Hidden Peak, K58,08026,509Baltoro Karakoram K21958
12Broad Peak, K38,05126,414Baltoro Karakoram Gasherbrum I1957
13Gasherbrum II, K48,03426,362Baltoro Karakoram Gasherbrum I1956
14Shishapangma8,01326,289Jugal Himalaya Cho Oyu1964

Cho Oyu

From Wikipedia

Cho Oyu (Nepali: चोयु; Chinese: 卓奧有山; pinyin: Zhuó’àoyǒu Shān; Tibetan: ཇོ་བོ་དབུ་ཡ, Wylie: jo bo dbu yag, ZYPY: Qowowuyag) is the sixth highest mountain in the world at 8,201 metres (26,906 ft) above sea level. Cho Oyu means “Turquoise Goddess” in Tibetan. The mountain stands on the Tibet-Nepal border.

Just a few kilometres west of Cho Oyu is Nangpa La (5,716m/18,753 ft), a glaciated pass that serves as the main trading route between the Tibetans and the Khumbu’s Sherpas. This pass separates the Khumbu and Rolwaling Himalayas. Due to its proximity to this pass and the generally moderate slopes of the standard northwest ridge route, Cho Oyu is considered the easiest 8,000 metre peak to climb. It is a popular objective for professionally guided parties.

Climbing History
Cho Oyu was first attempted in 1952 by an expedition organised and financed by the Joint Himalayan Committee of Great Britain as preparation for an attempt on Mount Everest the following year. The expedition was led by Eric Shipton and included Edmund Hillary & Tom Bourdillon. A foray by Hillary and George Lowe was stopped due to technical difficulties and avalanche danger at an ice cliff above 6,650 m (21,820 ft) and a report of Chinese troops a short distance across the border influenced Shipton to retreat from the mountain rather than continue to attempt to summit.

The mountain was first climbed on October 19, 1954, via the north-west ridge by Herbert Tichy, Joseph Jöchler and Sherpa Pasang Dawa Lama of an Austrian expedition.[4] Cho Oyu was the fifth 8000 metre peak to be climbed, after Annapurna in June 1950, Mount Everest in May 1953, Nanga Parbat in July 1953 and K2 in July 1954.

Shishapangma

From Wikipedia

Shishapangma also called Gosainthān, is the fourteenth-highest mountain in the world and, at 8,013 m (26,289 ft), the lowest of the eight-thousanders. It was the last 8,000 metre peak to be climbed, due to its location entirely within Tibet and the restrictions on visits by foreigners to the region imposed by national Chinese and regional Tibetan authorities.

Name

There are several different theories about the meaning of the mountain’s name. Geologist Toni Hagen explained the name as meaning a “grassy plain” or “meadow” (pangma) above a “comb” or a “range” (shisha or chisa) in the local Tibetan dialect, thereby signifying the “crest above the grassy plains”.On the other hand, Tibetologist Guntram Hazod records a local story that explains the mountain’s name in terms of its literal meaning in the Standard Tibetan language: shisha, which means “meat of an animal that died of natural causes”; and sbangma which means “malt dregs left over from brewing beer”. According to the story, one year a heavy snowfall killed most of the animals at pasture, and all that the people living near the mountain had to eat was the meat of the dead animals and the malt dregs left over from brewing beer, and so the mountain was named Shisha Pangma (shisha sbangma), signifiying “meat of dead animals and malty dregs”. The Sanskrit name of the mountain, Gosainthan, means “place of the saint” or “Abode of God”.

Geography

Shishapangma is located in south-central Tibet, five kilometres from the border with Nepal. It is the only eight-thousander entirely within Chinese territory. It is also the highest peak in the Jugal Himal which is contiguous with and often considered part of Langtang Himal. The Jugal/Langtang Himal straddles the Tibet/Nepal border. Since Shishapangma is on the dry north side of the Himalayan crest and further from the lower terrain of Nepal, it has less dramatic vertical relief than most major Himalayan peaks.

Ascents and Attempts

Up to 2009, 24 people have died climbing Shishapangma, including Alex Lowe and Dave Bridges (both USA) in 1999, and veteran Portuguese climber Bruno Carvalho. Nevertheless, Shishapangma is one of the easier eight-thousanders to climb. The standard route ascends via the northwest face and northeast ridge and face (“Northern Route”), and boasts relatively easy access, with vehicle travel possible to base camp at 5,000 m (16,400 ft). Routes on the steeper southwest face are more technically demanding and involve 2,200 metres (7,218 feet) of ascent on a 50-degree slope.

First Ascent:
Shishapangma was first climbed via the Northern Route on 2 May 1964 by a Chinese expedition led by Xǔ Jìng 许竞. In addition to Xǔ Jìng, the summit team consisted of Zhāng Jùnyán 张俊岩, Wang Fuzhou (Wáng Fùzhōu 王富洲), Wū Zōngyuè 邬宗岳, Chén Sān 陈三, Soinam Dorjê (Suǒnán Duōjí 索南多吉), Chéng Tiānliàng 程天亮, Migmar Zhaxi (Mǐmǎ Zháxī 米马扎西), Dorjê (Duōjí 多吉) and Yún Dēng 云登.

Climbing Shishapangma & Cho Oyu Back-to-Back

Here is a list of individuals who have climbed Shishapangma & Cho Oyu back-to-back. Mike Hamill and I were able to summit Shishapanmga on October 4th 2011 and then, once acclimatized, head over to summit Cho Oyu on October 12th 2011 in preparation for my Everest ascent in 2012.

FISCHBACHTilmanGerSHISHA PANGMA-CHO OYU
15.05.198830.05.198815
GÜRTLERKlaus
ASHISHA PANGMA-CHO OYU
15.05.1988
30.05.198815
BÄRNTHALERHansASHISHA PANGMA-CHO OYU
17.05.1988
03.06.1988
17
KUNZENDORFWolfgangGerSHISHA PANGMA-CHO OYU
17.05.1988
03.06.1988
17
THOMANNDieterGerSHISHA PANGMA-CHO OYU
17.05.1988
03.06.1988
17
MARTINISergioItSHISHA PANGMA-CHO OYU
05.09.198817.09.1988
12
DE STEFANI
FaustoItSHISHA PANGMA-CHO OYU
05.09.198817.09.198812
SAEGUSATeruoJp
SHISHA PANGMA-CHO OYU
24.10.1988
06.11.1988
13
YAMAMOTOAtsushiJp
CHO OYU-SHISHA PANGMA
24.10.1988
06.11.1988
13
NAMSun-Woo
SKCHO OYU-SHISHA PANGMA
20.09.1992
02.10.1992
12
KIMYoung-Tae
SKCHO OYU-SHISHA PANGMA
20.09.1992
02.10.1992
12
PUSTELNIKPiotrPlCHO OYU-SHISHA PANGMA
24.09.1993
07.10.1993
13
BIANCHIMarcoItCHO OYU-SHISHA PANGMA
18.09.1993
07.10.1993
19
WIELICKIKrzysztofPlCHO OYU-SHISHA PANGMA
18.09.1993
07.10.1993
19
MAUDUITChantal (f)FSHISHA PANGMA-CHO OYU
04.10.1993
31.10.1993
27
HASLERBrunoCHCHO OYU-SHISHA PANGMA
04.05.1996
21.05.1996
17
ZINSLIChristianCHCHO OYU-SHISHA PANGMA
02.05.1996
21.05.1996
19
BLANCAbeleItSHISHA PANGMA-CHO OYU
14.05.1998
23.05.1998
9
CAMANDONAMarcoItSHISHA PANGMA-CHO OYU
14.05.1998
23.05.1998
9
FOWLERCharlesUSACHO OYU-SHISHA PANGMA
24.09.200010.10.2000
16
AMANOKazuakiJpCHO OYU-SHISHA PANGMA
03.05.2006
18.05.200615
KATOYoshinobuJpCHO OYU-SHISHA PANGMA
03.05.2006
18.05.200615
KOPOLDJozef (Dodo)
SlkCHO OYU-SHISHA PANGMA
31.03.2007
24.04.2007
24
STECKUlrich (Ueli)
CHSHISHA PANGMA-CHO OYU
17.04.2011
05.05.2011
18

Mount Everest

From Wikipedia

Mount Everest, also known in Nepal as Sagarmāthā and in Tibet as Chomolungma, is Earth’s highest mountain. It is located in the Mahalangur mountain range in Nepal and Tibet.  Its peak is 8,850 metres (29,035 ft) above sea level.

Climbing History

There were a series of early attempts, however, amongst the most famous was that of 8 June 1924, when George Mallory and Andrew Irvine made an attempt on the summit via the North Col/North Ridge/Northeast Ridge route from which they never returned. On 1 May 1999, the Mallory and Irvine Research Expedition found Mallory’s body on the North Face in a snow basin below and to the west of the traditional site of Camp VI. Controversy has raged in the mountaineering community whether one or both of them reached the summit 29 years before the confirmed ascent (and of course, safe descent) of Everest by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay in 1953.

First successful ascent by Tenzing and Hillary

In 1953, a ninth British expedition, led by John Hunt, returned to Nepal. Hunt selected two climbing pairs to attempt to reach the summit. The first pair (Tom Bourdillon and Charles Evans) came within 100 m (330 feet) of the summit on 26 May 1953, but turned back after running into oxygen problems. Two days later, the expedition made its second and final assault on the summit with its second climbing pair, the New Zealander Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay, a Nepali Sherpa climber from Darjeeling, India.

They reached the summit at 11:30 am local time on 29 May 1953 via the South Col Route.  News of the expedition’s success reached London on the morning of Queen Elizabeth II’s coronation, 2 June. Returning to Kathmandu a few days later, Hunt (a Briton) and Hillary (a New Zealander) discovered that they had been promptly knighted in the Order of the British for the ascent.  Tenzing, a Nepali Sherpa who was a citizen of India, was granted the George Medal.

Manaslu

From Wikipedia

Manaslu (also known as Kutang) is the eighth highest mountain in the world at 8,163 metres (26,781 feet) above sea level. It is located in the Mansiri Himal, part of the Nepalese Himalayas, in the west-central part of Nepal. Its name, which means “mountain of the spirit”, comes from the Sanskrit word manasa, meaning “intellect” or “soul”.

Climbing History

In 1952, a Japanese reconnaissance party visited the area after the monsoon season. In the following year (1953), a team of 15 climbers led by Y. Mita, after setting up base camp at Samagaon, attempted to climb via the east side but failed to reach the summit. In this first attempt by a Japanese team to summit via the northeast face, three climbers reached a height of 7,750 metres (25,430 feet), before turning back.

In 1954, a Japanese team approaching from the Buri Gandaki route to the peak faced a hostile group of villagers at Samagaon camp. The villagers thought that the previous expeditions had displeased the gods, causing the avalanches that destroyed the Pung-gyen Monastery and the death of 18 people. As a result of this hostility, the team made a hasty retreat to Ganesh Himal.  To appease local sentiments, a large donation was made to rebuild the monastery. However, this philanthropic act did not ease the atmosphere of distrust and hostility towards Japanese expeditions.

Manaslu was first climbed on May 9, 1956 by Toshio Imanishi and Gyalzen Norbu, members of a Japanese expedition. It is said that, “just as the British consider Everest their mountain, Manaslu has always been a Japanese mountain.”  Even the expedition in 1956, which successfully climbed the mountain, faced (hostility from the villagers) and as a result the next Japanese expedition only took place in 1971.

© E. Jurgalski for 8000ers.com

Seven Summits: Defining the Continents, © 2008 Adam Helman, Ph.D.

To learn more about 8,000 meter peaks see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eight-thousander